Mahimaa Chawla

Social Media

Introducing Instagram Stories

A new feature that lets you share all the moments of your day, not just the ones you want to keep on your profile. As you share multiple photos and videos, they appear together in a slideshow format: your story.

With Instagram Stories, you don’t have to worry about overposting. Instead, you can share as much as you want throughout the day — with as much creativity as you want. You can bring your story to life in new ways with text and drawing tools. The photos and videos will disappear after 24 hours and won’t appear on your profile grid or in feed.

You’ll see stories from people you follow in a bar at the top of your feed — from your best friends to your favorite popular accounts. When there’s something new to see, their profile photo will have a colorful ring around it.

To view someone’s story, just tap on their profile photo. It’s easy to view stories at your own pace: tap to go back and forward or swipe to jump to another person’s story. If you want to comment on something you see, you can tap and send a private message to that person on Instagram Direct. Unlike regular posts, there are no likes or public comments.

Your story follows the privacy settings of your account. If you set your account to private, your story is visible only to your followers. However, you can also easily hide your entire story from anyone you don’t want to see it, even if they follow you. When watching your own story, swipe up to check out who’s seen each photo and video. You can even choose to feature a particular part of your story by posting it on your profile.

Instagram has always been a place to share the moments you want to remember. Now you can share your highlights and everything in between, too.

Instagram Stories will be rolling out globally over the next few weeks on iOS and Android.To learn more, check out the Instagram Help Center:help.instagram.com/1660923094227526

copyright : Instagram

 

 

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The Art of the Pin

Make Your Pins Tall

This official video from Pinterest emphasizes the importance of tall images. Unlike wide images, tall ones look better in the column format that Pinterest uses. Size is of particular relevance when viewing pins on a smartphone, where Pinterest users are most active.

 

 

 

 

Copyright – Pinterest, Viralwoot.com

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Instagram Update- “Turn on Notification”!! Should I?

Changes to Instagram’s algorithm will present photos out of chronological order. But users should not rush to change their preferences just yet

Forthcoming changes to Instagram’s algorithm, which will present photoInstagram updates out of chronological order, have thrown the photo-sharing app into chaos, with users asking their followers to “turn on notifications” so their updates aren’t lost to the new regime.

Don’t do it. For your sake. Not yet, anyway.

Turning on notifications for Rihanna, for example, means you’ll be told every time she posts a new photo. It is the equivalent of Rihanna texting you to tell you that she’s put a pic up on Instagram, but without the close relationship with Rihanna implicit in that scenario.

Sometimes Rihanna posts several images a day. You’d receive a text to let you know, every time. Annoying, right? Even in the case of Rihanna, arguably the only person worth following on Instagram.

— Cђelsea Crockett (@ChelseaCrockett) March 28, 2016

I love everyone I follow on instagram, but I honestly don’t want a notification every time someone posts

Don’t turn on notifications. Your phone is already buzzing and bleeping and wishing you “a nice day” and asking if you’ve “been affected by the explosion” (?!) – you don’t need to be personally notified every time that person you don’t know posts a picture of a meal you didn’t order or a sunset you didn’t see or a coffee you really, really need right now because you just got told @badgalriri’s postedanother photo to Instagram.

(To clarify: in accordance with her “dgaf” public persona, Rihanna has not asked her 36.1 million followers to turn on notifications (Ellie Goulding has).)

In short, don’t turn on notifications. And definitely don’t for everyone who asks you to. The only person you should turn on notifications for is your crush, and if you’re smart you’d have done that ages ago.

— Tyler Oakley (@tyleroakley) March 28, 2016

ATTENTION!!! instagram is changing their algorithms, so if you want to see important updates, please turn on notifications for @zaynmalik

We don’t know the specifics of how Instagram’s timeline is changing. The spate ofposts hashtagged #InstagramChanges over the past 24 hours seems to have been sparked by one unknown “influencer”, who spurred others to follow suit like lemmings off a cliff, panicked by a change confirmed by the platform on 15 March.

In its infinite wisdom, Instagram has decided that ordering posts from newest to oldest means you are probably missing out on “the posts you might care about the most”. It neglected to expand on what posts it thought you might care about the most but said “you may be surprised to learn that people miss on average 70% of their feeds”.

It signalled that photos and videos would “soon” be ordered “based on the likelihood you’ll be interested in the content, your relationship with the person posting and the timeliness of the post”.

“If your favorite musician shares a video from last night’s concert, it will be waiting for you when you wake up, no matter how many accounts you follow or what time zone you live in. And when your best friend posts a photo of her new puppy , you won’t miss it.”

Instagram’s statement clarified that the change would affect the ordering of posts, not whether they appeared at all: “All the posts will still be there, just in a different order” – though it did preface that with “as we begin”, the obvious inference being that it’s only getting started.

Facebook, which bought the photo-sharing app for US $1bn in 2012, introduced a similar change to its news feed in 2014 – now there is no way to consistently viewit in reverse chronological order. Its users complained then, too.

MTV, assumedly speaking on behalf of youth, complained that Instagram “used to be the great equalizer: The quality of your photos and your photos alone would either lead you to Insta-fame or cast you into the deep blue sea of Insta-nothingness. But, like Facebook, Instagram believes that robots hold the answer to our happiness.”

The timeframe Instagram gave for this “new experience” was “the coming months”.

“We’re going to take time to get this right and listen to your feedback along the way.”

An Instagram spokesman told Guardian Australia there were still “weeks, if not months, of testing” to go before the feature is rolled out beyond a small test group.

“We’ll certainly confirm things when the changes are made,” he said.

But going by users’ myriad pleas for notifications to be enabled on Monday, something must have spooked them. With the platform thrown into disarray, the company attempted to calm the community on Twitter.

— Instagram (@instagram) March 28, 2016

We’re listening and we assure you nothing is changing with your feed right now. We promise to let you know when changes roll out broadly.

It’s easy to see why the brands and personalities for whom Instagram is their primary platform are concerned – it’s a site of significant commerce, with individual influencers asking hundreds, even thousands of dollars to promote products on their pages, depending on their following.

Changes to the algorithm, such as that confirmed by the platform on 15 March, affect how many people they can guarantee their posts are reaching, which could affect how much money they can ask advertisers for.

Until the extent of the changes become apparent, for the majority of the platform’s 300m users, it’s another one of those irritating reminders that the places where we work, play, communicate and otherwise while away our time online are subject to the whims of teams working in “user experience”, which may or may not have our best interests at heart.

It’s annoying, yes – but it is almost certainly not as annoying as receiving notifications.

Copyright – http://www.theguardian.com/

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#FacebookReactions: Can These Affect Ads?

Facebook Reaction
Facebook Reaction
This blog will give you an insight on how the newly-introduced Facebook reactions can affect the ads.

Facebook, recently, announced the expansion of its like feature, called Reactions
Rolling out across the world from past two days, the reactions will have five emoticons, apart from the ‘Like’, expressing love, laughter, wow moment, sadness and anger. Facebook had also tested a ‘Yay’ emoticon, a smiling face with rosy cheeks but, was removed during testing because it was not fully understood by the test users.

What is Facebook Reactions?
Reactions is an extension of the Like button we all have been accustomed to for all these years of using Facebook. These emoticons have refined the way we see and respond to different posts. Imagine who would want to click a like button to a sad news? Well, now you have asad emoticon to depict the same.
Or what if you not just like a photo but simply love it? Here’s a heart sign that will let you show your love.

Similarly, laughter emoticon can be used on posts you find extremely hilarious, wow to some of the never-seen-before kind of posts and anger to posts that make you feel angry.

Would Reactions affect Facebook Ads?

As per Facebook metrics, which includes likes in ads reports, will also include Reactions from here on. These won’t be broken down into individual Reactions.
Breakdown of Reactions can be seen in page insights only. So, an advertiser can analyse the Reactions breakdown from Page Insights. So, receiving more “Angry” can be taken as users displeasure towards the content, while love can depict the posts that go perfectly well with the target audience.

For ads delivery, Reactions are treated in the same way as Likes for Ads delivery.

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